Six Women
CURATED BY ERIC HEIST (US): ROSEMARIE PADOVANO (US), BAHAR BEHBAHANI (US/TEHERAN), JACQUELINE HOANG NGUYEN (US/SE), JESSICA ANN PEAVY (US), DIANE NERWEN (US), JULIA OLDHAM (US) 
Preview FEB 15. 2013 / 6-9pm


This video screening brings together six women artists now living in New York hailing from diverse backgrounds. The reel was originally conceived as an outdoor projection for the Brooklyn Academy of Music, the challenge being that the work had to express an idea without relying on sound for its conveyance. Some of the work here reflects that original challenge, and provides a theme to approach individual works.

Rosemarie Padovano’s Please Touch, was created specifically for such a challenge, providing a tactile corollary to the experience of an artwork. Bahar Behbahani’s Snakes and Ladders uses minimal sound effects to achieve a sense of menace from toy soldiers that signal the fears that lie in the mundane, the everyday and ubiquitous that saturates us with colonizing perspectives from early childhood on. Jessica Ann Peavy’s powerful voice also questions the dependability and the construction of truth, providing multiple interpretations of an event that underlies assumptions and misinterpretations that occur between Spanish and English speakers in New York. Diane Nerwen’s Open House video, chronicling the destruction of a Brooklyn neighborhood making way for gentrification, relies on the contrast of sounds of violent destruction with the quietude of inter-titles describing the ideal community to prospective buyers in order to emphasize the violence of gentrification. Jacqueline Hoang Nguyen’s piece documents individuals listening to a laugh soundtrack, a recognition of the socially transformative potential of laughter based on a supposed occurrence of infectious laughter that occurred in an African village. We see the effect of infectious laughter through silence. And in Julia Oldham’s Infinitely Impossible, the artist shows herself, through a series of silent, solitary mathematical actions, attempting to get closer to a larger meaning.

Photo: Erik Sæter Jørgensen